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Robert D. Crutchfield

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780814717073

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814717073.001.0001

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A Tale of My Two Cities

A Tale of My Two Cities

Chapter:
(p.225) 8 A Tale of My Two Cities
Source:
Get a Job
Author(s):

Robert D. Crutchfield

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814717073.003.0008

This concluding chapter provides suggestions, speculates on policies that might mitigate the problems described in the previous chapters, and considers new directions for research. It draws from the author's experience living in two cities: Pittsburgh and Seattle. From being a major industrial city in the early twentieth century, Pittsburgh struggles due to the decline of the American industrial sector which has led to an increase in homicide and gang violence. On the other hand, crime rates in Seattle are significantly lower. This can be traced to the city being a “twenty-first century industry town” and through the educational, racial, and ethnic composition of the city's residents, and importantly to the nature of the local labor market. Both cities, however, are creating new generations of criminals because much of the adult population is marginalized in the labor market and too many children are marginalized from school.

Keywords:   Pittsburgh, Seattle, American industrial sector, homicide, gang violence, crime rate, ethnic composition, local labor market, marginalization

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