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Divorced from RealityRethinking Family Dispute Resolution$
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Jane C. Murphy and Jana B. Singer

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780814708934

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814708934.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

(p.128) 7 Creating a Twenty-First-Century Family Dispute Resolution System

(p.128) 7 Creating a Twenty-First-Century Family Dispute Resolution System

Chapter:
(p.128) 7 Creating a Twenty-First-Century Family Dispute Resolution System
Source:
Divorced from Reality
Author(s):

Jane C. Murphy

Jana B. Singer

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814708934.003.0008

This concluding chapter offers a series of recommendations designed to address the disconnection between the new paradigm and today's families, and to adjust the balance between court-based and community-based approaches to family dispute resolution. Twenty-first-century reformers should consider moving some of the non-adversary processes and services that characterize the new paradigm out of the court system and into the community. They should also look for ways to enhance children's participation in the non-adversarial resolution of family disputes. Moreover, today's reformers should look beyond divorcing couples and adopt processes and services that better serve the needs of never-married parents and other family structures. Finally, rather than bypassing lawyers, reformers should pursue alternative models of legal representation that can both enhance access to legal services and promote durable resolutions for families.

Keywords:   families, family dispute resolution, non-adversary processes, court system, child participation, family structures, legal representation

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