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The Chinese Heroin TradeCross-Border Drug Trafficking in Southeast Asia and Beyond$
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Ko-lin Chin and Sheldon X. Zhang

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781479895403

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479895403.001.0001

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Wholesale Heroin Trafficking

Wholesale Heroin Trafficking

Chapter:
(p.58) 3 Wholesale Heroin Trafficking
Source:
The Chinese Heroin Trade
Author(s):

Ko-lin Chin

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479895403.003.0003

This chapter discusses the characteristics of the wholesale heroin market by examining some of the major drug trafficking cases between Burma and China since the mid-1980s. It takes an in-depth look at the rise and fall of a heroin kingpin, Tan Xiaolin, and mid-level heroin traffickers, Jiang Jiatian and Yang Jufen. It examines the role of southern China in wholesale drug trafficking, especially Guangdong and its vicinity. It concludes that the Chinese high-level drug market is very similar to the high-level drug trades in the United States, the Great Britain, and Canada, but very different from those in Mexico and Colombia, especially in terms of monopoly, violence, and corruption. Drug markets in countries like the United States, Great Britain, Canada, and China, under strict enforcement, tend to be small, nonhierarchical, poorly organized, with less violence and corruption, and exist on the margins of society. In lax enforcement countries such as Mexico and Colombia, drug trafficking organizations tend to be larger, better organized, more likely to use violence and corruption. Members of these organizations “can lead very comfortable lives, publicly enjoying their wealth and circulating in high society in the company of high level politicians.”

Keywords:   Burma, China, drug trade, drug trafficking, drug market, heroin, drug traffickers, Tan Xiaolin, Jiang Jiatian, Yang Jufen

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