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Managing InequalityNorthern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit$
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Karen R. Miller

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479880096

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479880096.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.262) Conclusion
Source:
Managing Inequality
Author(s):

Karen R. Miller

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479880096.003.0009

This concluding chapter chronicles the continuing racial tensions in Detroit, noting that as white leaders devised new strategies for managing and containing the growing African American population, black activists, conversely, worked to build a city that prioritized justice and equality over the maintenance of segregation. Yet soon after the end of the Second World War, “race relations” became the language through which seemingly well-intentioned white liberals managed African American complaints about structural inequalities. State actors helped to produce and sustain racial inequality at the same time that they said they were producing institutions designed to improve race relations or even extend new resources to African Americans and other people of color in cities.

Keywords:   Detroit, African American population, Second World War, race relations, white liberals, racial inequality

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