Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Making the Empire WorkLabor and United States Imperialism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel E. Bender and Jana K. Lipman

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781479871254

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479871254.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Introduction

Introduction

Through the Looking Glass: U.S. Empire through the Lens of Labor History

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Making the Empire Work
Author(s):

Daniel E. Bender

Jana K. Lipman

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479871254.003.0014

This introductory chapter discusses the labor systems that made the U.S. empire from the point of view of labor historians. These chroniclers have recorded that the metropolitan immigrant worker, the faraway plantation laborer, and the domestic guest worker of the United States were joined by flows of goods and commodities, but are separated by notions of ineffable distance. Their stories raise questions about the relationships between worker and employer, solidarity and dissent, distance and proximity, and production and consumption. In addition, the chapter states that the emphasis on empire and labor forces an engagement with a global economy that intimately connects the tropics with industrial production.

Keywords:   U.S. empire, labor historians, metropolitan immigrant worker, plantation laborer, domestic guest worker, global economy, industrial production

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.