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Age in AmericaThe Colonial Era to the Present$
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Corinne T. Field and Nicholas L. Syrett

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781479870011

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479870011.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Age in America
Author(s):

Corinne T. Field

Nicholas L. Syrett

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479870011.003.0001

The introduction lays out the overall goals of this volume, which are: to demonstrate how and why particular ages—such as sixteen, eighteen, and sixty-five—have come to define rights, cultural expectations, and self-understandings; to demonstrate that while age and aging have mattered throughout American history, reliance on age intensified in the late nineteenth century; and to encourage a more rigorous engagement with age as a category of identity. The editors argue that age is both a biological reality and a social construction, and they insist that age always intersects with other categories such as class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.

Keywords:   age, aging, rights, identity, social construction, class, gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality

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