Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Impossible JewIdentity and the Reconstruction of Jewish American Literary History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Benjamin Schreier

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781479868681

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479868681.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Introduction

Introduction

The School of Criticism I Wouldn’t Be Caught Dead In: A Polemic on Theorizing the Field

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Impossible Jew
Author(s):

Benjamin Schreier

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479868681.003.0001

This book explores how Jewish American literary study has alienated itself—in the form of insiderism, trivialization, and ghettoization—compared to American studies and ethnic American literary formations. It examines the lines of relation and mutuality between Jewish American literary study and those institutional establishments from which it persists in isolation, such as American studies, multicultural and multiethnic studies, critical theory, and Jewish studies. It also considers the Jewishness that anchors the field of Jewish American literature specifically and Jewish studies more generally, along with multiple and often discontinuous histories and agents accounting for the field's ghettoization. The book employs a literary critical concept of Jewishness to reveal the history, meaning, and power of Jewish identity and articulates a concept of particularity for the study of identity that is neither positivistically opposed to some ontological concept of universality nor grounded in what is inevitably nationalized and biologized ethnic self-evidence.

Keywords:   insiderism, trivialization, ghettoization, Jewish American literary study, Jewishness, Jewish American literature, Jewish studies, Jewish identity

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.