Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Unsettled StatesNineteenth-Century American Literary Studies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dana Luciano and Ivy Wilson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479857722

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479857722.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Race, Reenactment, and the “Natural-Born Citizen”

Race, Reenactment, and the “Natural-Born Citizen”

Chapter:
(p.76) 3 Race, Reenactment, and the “Natural-Born Citizen”
Source:
Unsettled States
Author(s):

Tavia Nyong’o

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479857722.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the “historical” claims of the Tea Party movement as it reorients and reinvents the Revolutionary War archive. The temporal bend that loops the Tea Party to this revolutionary event camouflages its stronger historical investment in the 14th Amendment's post-Civil War reversal of the foundational terms of citizenship. Tracing the “queasiness” of this time-shifting alliance with white racial innocence, the chapter sets a contemporary performance of archival reenactment against the creative engagement with citizenship portrayed in David Walker's 1829 Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World. Its analysis of the Tea-Party inspired reading of the Constitution is shaped by two books, Rebecca Schneider's Performing Remains (2011) and Jill Lepore's The Whites of Their Eyes (2010), both of which engage aspects of historical reenactment culture in America.

Keywords:   Tea Party movement, Revolutionary War archive, archival reenactment, racial innocence, David Walker, Rebecca Schneider, Jill Lepore, American culture

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.