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Restricted Access"Media, Disability, and the Politics of Participation"$
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Elizabeth Ellcessor

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781479813803

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479813803.001.0001

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The Net Experience

The Net Experience

Intersectional Identities and Cultural Accessibility

Chapter:
(p.157) 5 The Net Experience
Source:
Restricted Access
Author(s):

Elizabeth Ellcessor

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479813803.003.0006

This chapter is based on ethnographic research in a disability blogosphere. It is guided by questions about experience: How is a medium experienced and defined by various groups or individuals, in relation to particular embodied identities, material forms, or social contexts? What are the variations in access revealed by experience? By what processes, and in what contexts, can access be taken advantage of or extended? In this chapter, it becomes clear that people with disabilities often conceive of accessibility quite differently, introducing elements of culture, pleasure, and inclusion rather than simple possibility. This is termed cultural accessibility, which figures access as an ongoing experience to be created and enjoyed by the people who seek it. This is particularly important in a disability context, in which active inclusion and coalitional politics have a long history in the creation of disability culture.

Keywords:   access, participation, cultural accessibility, disability, collaboration, Dreamwidth, Amara, Easy Chirp, Fix the Web

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