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American ConservatismNOMOS LVI$
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Sanford Levinson, Melissa Williams, and Joel Parker

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781479812370

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479812370.001.0001

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What Fascism Teaches Us

What Fascism Teaches Us

Chapter:
(p.402) 12 What Fascism Teaches Us
Source:
American Conservatism
Author(s):

Arthur J. Jacobson

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479812370.003.0012

This chapter examines the relationship of fascism to reason, tradition, and the conservative/liberal divide. Fascism has a defensive strategy to survive against reason. It has the faith that human beings by nature experience the life of reason as loveless and not worth living. It has the faith that reason as the basis for community cannot sustain itself. In other words, fascism has the faith that reason cannot organize a tradition, either to maintain itself as reason or to construct a lasting community. Fascism’s argument with reason in any of its iterations—communist, liberal, or conservative—is that reason can only be accepted on its own terms, as reason, and not on the irrational terms that must, according to fascism, be at the root of every successful civilization.

Keywords:   fascism, reason, tradition, Communism, conservatism, liberalism

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