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Progressive PunishmentJob Loss, Jail Growth and the Neoliberal Logic of Carceral Expansion$
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Judah Schept

Print publication date: 1942

Print ISBN-13: 9781479810710

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479810710.001.0001

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Seeing like a Jail, 2

Seeing like a Jail, 2

Corrections Consulting

Chapter:
(p.140) 6 Seeing like a Jail, 2
Source:
Progressive Punishment
Author(s):

Judah Schept

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479810710.003.0007

Chapter 6 is devoted entirely to a close examination of the substantial history of national and state corrections consultants in the county, paying particular attention to the two consultants whose work was instrumental in shaping the expansion projects that receive the most attention in the book. Both chapters 5 and 6 engage debates about exclusionary languages and practices of late modernity and map them onto ethnographic examples of policy discussions that abstracted human lives into penological concerns with management and control and that privileged experts at the expense of alternative-and very real-understandings of incarceration. In examining consultants’ official reports, practitioners’ testimonies, and editorials and news stories in the media, these chapters trace the epistemological processes by which local carceral politics came to embrace and resemble the carceral state, even as many people in the community claimed a certain degree of knowledge about mass incarceration that absolved them of any complicity in its local replication.

Keywords:   Consultants, Discourse, Epistemology, Expertise, Knowledge production

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