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Becoming RastaOrigins of Rastafari Identity in Jamaica$

Charles Price

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814767467

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814767467.001.0001

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(p.241) References

(p.241) References

Source:
Becoming Rasta
Publisher:
NYU Press

Primary

Authored Columns and Articles

Alvaranga, Philmore, Samuel Clayton, and Douglas Mack. 1965. The back to Africa mission. Daily Gleaner, March 27.

Alveranga, Philmore, and Douglas Mack. 1961. Experiences among the people. Daily Gleaner, July 31.

Carradine, John. 1940. The Ras Tafarites retreat to mountain fastnesses of St. Catherine. Daily Gleaner, November 23.

Douglas, M. B. 1961. Most treasured experience of my life. Daily Gleaner, July 31.

Evans, Lancelot. 1964. Three cultists build international image for Rastafarians. Star, May 1.

Parchment, Clinton. 1960. Rascally Rastafarians. Daily Gleaner, April 30.

Reynolds, C. Roy. 2000. Alexander Bedward: The final solution (Part IV). Daily Gleaner, October 27.

Spence, Sam. 1959. Back-to-Africa. Sunday Gleaner, October 25.

Wright, Thomas. 1960. Candidly yours… Daily Gleaner, July 9.

News Stories

Daily Gleaner

1930. Presented Scepter to New Emperor, November 3.

1934. Leonard Howell being tried for sedition in St. Thomas, March 14.

1934. Leonard Howell, on trial says Ras Tafari is Messiah returned to earth, March 15.

1934. Ras Tafari disciple found guilty of sedition, March 16.

1934. Howell given 2-year term for sedition, March 17.

1934. Playing with fire, August 20.

1935. Ras Tafari cults excited Portlanders, July 30.

1935. Sequel to Ras-Tafari cult in districts of St. Thomas Parish, August 19.

1937. Ras Tafari cult, March 18.

1939. Ethiopian Salvation Society, April 3.

1939. Society celebration, April 4.

1941. Police Raid “Pinnacle,” Ras Tafarian den. Siege sentry, but miss chief, July 15.

(p.242) 1941. Camera record of police raid on Ras Tafaris at “Pinnacle,” July 16.

1941. Three tried in Pinnacle camp cases; Pleas taken yesterday. Trials to take place Monday and Tuesday, July 23.

1941. Cult leader held by police in his home, July 26.

1941. Howell before R. M. Court at Spanish town, July 29.

1941. Cult followers sent to prison, July 31.

1941. ‘Ras Tafarian’ head convicted at Spanish Town, August 25.

1954. Policeman tells court he is now ‘Ras Jackson,’ April 17.

1955. Large audience hears message from Ethiopia, September 30.

1959. No passports, no bookings; but ‘going back to Africa,’ October 6.

1959. ‘Back-to-Africa’ Rastas stranded, October 7.

1960. Weapons seized in raid on church headquarters, April 7.

1960. Rastafarians stone police, May 4.

1960. Letter to Castro in Court, May 6.

1960. Henry and 15 committed, May 11.

1960. 2 more hunted men captured, July 12.

1960. Urges Mission-to-Africa to plan Rasta migration, August 2.

1960. Gov’t accepts African mission in principle, August 3.

1960. Migration mission will go to Africa, August 19.

1960. Three more seek appeal to privy council, December 23.

1961. Henry, Gabbidon hanged, March 29.

1961a. Majority report of the mission to Africa, July 31.

1961b. Diverse reactions and behavior within the mission, Dr. L. C. Leslie, reports, July 31.

1961c. The minority report, July 31.

1963. 8 killed after attack on gas station, April 13.

1963. Police net 160 beards, April 13.

1966. When the Emperor spoke in English, April 23.

1974. Armed forces to decide Selassie’s future soon, August 27.

1975a. Selassie dies at 83, August 28.

1975b. Manley, Seaga regret, August 28.

Jamaica Times

1963. Rastas and police: An improvement, March 24.

Star

1958. Rastafari convention a nuisance, March 3.

1958. Cultists convention, March 6.

1958. City ‘captured’; Cops take it Back, ‘Beards’ Invade Victoria Park, March 24.

1962. Some Rastas are cavemen, April 9.

1966. Fear Emperor may disown Rastas, n.d.

(p.243) Sunday Guardian

1960. Photographic essay, May 1.

Sunday Gleaner

1966. Takes dim view of Rastas’ behavior, n.d.

Tribune

1958. Bearded Cultists Take Over Old Kings House, June 30.

INTERVIEWS

Formally Interviewed

Women

Prophetess Esther

Rasta Ivey

Sister Amma

Sister Coromanti

Sister Ecila

Sister Mariam

Sister Pear

Men

Bongo J

Brother Barody

Brother Bongo

Brother Dee

Brother Woks

Brother Yendis

Ras Alex

Ras Brenton

Ras Chronicle

Ras General

Ras Sam Brown

Rasta J

Informal Interviews, Conversations

Women

Empress Dinah

Ma Lion

Sister Sersi

(p.244) Men

Ras Cee

Ras Desmond

Ras Grantly

Ras Jayze

Ras Kirk

Ras Tee

Ras Winston

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