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New Desires, New SelvesSex, Love, and Piety among Turkish Youth$
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Gul Ozyegin

Print publication date: 1937

Print ISBN-13: 9780814762349

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814762349.001.0001

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Desire between “Doing” and “Being”

Desire between “Doing” and “Being”

İbne (Faggot) and Gey (Gay)

Chapter:
(p.243) 4 Desire between “Doing” and “Being”
Source:
New Desires, New Selves
Author(s):

Gul Ozyegin

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814762349.003.0005

Chapter 4 explores gey (gay) identification in Turkey with an emphasis on the way connectivity regulates gey identity construction for young, upwardly mobile males. A borrowed global category, "gey" has helped reorganize homosexuality in Turkey in recent decades from a category of behavior into a discrete identity with its own patterns of living and thinking. For the young men fashioning their selves after this global gey subjectivity, being gey is about more than having sex with other men; it is about forging relationships based on versatility of sex roles, egalitarianism, and intimacy. Class also emerges as an important mediator of gey identity for these men - dressing a certain way, visiting particular cafes and bars, and displaying other markers of middle-classness all help constitute one as "gey," while lower-class markers signal belonging to other stigmatized homosexual categories. Yet these young men's identification with global gey ideals is complicated by the strong role family connection and honor plays in their life. For them, coming out as "gey" can mean abandoning family connections or risking bringing shame to their loved ones.

Keywords:   Global gey, Versatility, Coming out, Shame, Honor, Upwardly -mobile gay

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