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Fire in the Canyon
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Fire in the Canyon: Religion, Migration, and the Mexican Dream

Leah M. Sarat

Abstract

The canyon in central Mexico was ablaze with torches as hundreds of people filed in. So palpable was their shared shock and grief, they later said, that neither pastor nor priest was needed. The event was a memorial service for one of their own who had died during an attempted border passage. Months later a survivor emerged from a coma to tell his story. The accident had provoked a near-death encounter with God that prompted his conversion to Pentecostalism. Today, over half of the local residents of El Alberto, a town in central Mexico, are Pentecostal. Submitting themselves to the authority ... More

Keywords: central Mexico, God, death, Pentecostalism, El Alberto, Pentecostal, migration, U.S.-Mexico border, ethnicity, religion

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2013 Print ISBN-13: 9780814759370
Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016 DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814759370.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Leah M. Sarat, author