Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Global Flow of InformationLegal, Social, and Cultural Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ramesh Subramanian and Eddan Katz

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814748114

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814748114.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Emerging Market Pharmaceutical Supply

Emerging Market Pharmaceutical Supply

A Prescription for Sharing the Benefits of Global Information Flow

Chapter:
(p.175) 10 Emerging Market Pharmaceutical Supply
Source:
The Global Flow of Information
Author(s):

Frederick M. Abbott

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814748114.003.0010

This chapter talks about the issue of how global flows of information could affect the whole notion of the right to medicines and the global pharmaceutical industry. It rejects the argument that enhanced global flows of information enables easier flow of information products such as pharmaceuticals. Pharmaceutical companies from developed economies have made it difficult for citizens of emerging economies to obtain access to the medicines, and often the medicines are priced unrealistically high for anybody in the developing world. Efforts by developing countries to overcome these problems are being challenged by developed pharmaceutical companies through various means, including pushing international treaties that safeguard patents, controlling distribution channels, and acquiring pharmaceutical companies in developing countries. The only solution for developing countries seems to be placing legal limits on foreign acquisitions and protectionist measures.

Keywords:   right to medicines, global pharmaceutical industry, pharmaceutical companies, developing countries, developed economies, protectionist measures

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.