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Black Women's Christian Activism
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Black Women's Christian Activism: Seeking Social Justice in a Northern Suburb

Betty Livingston Adams

Abstract

This book argues that religion made a difference in black working women’s activism and organizational strategies in the struggle for social justice in the first half of the twentieth century. Living and working in an overwhelmingly white and affluent New Jersey suburb, black women like Violet Johnson initially entered public space through their church work. Their willingness to challenge hegemonic assumptions of gender, race, and class amid the nationalization of Jim Crow segregation mattered in the churches they built, the institutions they created, and the communities they sustained. They ne ... More

Keywords: agency, Civil Rights Movement, domestic servant, electoral politics, Jim Crow, missionary, social justice, suburb, temperance reform, woman suffrage

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2016 Print ISBN-13: 9780814745465
Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016 DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814745465.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Betty Livingston Adams, author
Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis