Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Race for CitizenshipBlack Orientalism and Asian Uplift from Pre-Emancipation to Neoliberal America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Helen Heran Jun

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814742976

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814742976.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Blackness, Manhood, and the Aftermath of Internment in John Okada’s No-No Boy (1957)

Blackness, Manhood, and the Aftermath of Internment in John Okada’s No-No Boy (1957)

Chapter:
(p.51) 3 Blackness, Manhood, and the Aftermath of Internment in John Okada’s No-No Boy (1957)
Source:
Race for Citizenship
Author(s):

Helen Heran Jun

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814742976.003.0003

This chapter analyzes how representations of black masculinity and black social spaces inform the production of an Asian American masculine subjectivity in John Okada's No-No Boy (1958). This novel is narrated from the space of the multiracial ghetto and negotiates the Orientalist exclusion and national displacement of Asian Americans through gendered discourses of black urban pathology. Blackness is a complex locus of investment in the text, and black social spaces are imagined as being within the cultural boundaries of the U.S. nation even as the novel figures them as racialized sites of deviance to be disavowed. Moreover, histories of black racial exclusion help disarticulate Asian American masculinity from the white patriarchal authority of a U.S. nationalism that demands the assimilation of Oriental difference.

Keywords:   black masculinity, black social spaces, John Okada, No-No Boy, Asian American masculinity, U.S. nationalism

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.