Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Bodies of ReformThe Rhetoric of Character in Gilded Age America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James B. Salazar

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814741306

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814741306.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Character’s Conduct

Character’s Conduct

Spaces of Interethnic Emulation in Jane Addams’s “Charitable Effort”

Chapter:
(p.204) 5 Character’s Conduct
Source:
Bodies of Reform
Author(s):

James B. Salazar

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814741306.003.0005

This chapter takes up the problems of emulation and exemplification in the reform of character by examining Jane Addams's critique and rearticulation of the character-forming effects of the class contact experienced in traditional charity work. In challenging the gendered assumptions of women's work as philanthropic “stewards of character” and exemplars of middle-class character, Addams was able to capitalize on the power of the charity relation as a scene of interclass and interethnic contact while also extricating it from its emulatory function of character building and from the assimilationist practices of “Americanization” being enacted on Native American reservations, boarding schools, and in the overseas territories of the United States after the Spanish–American War. Addams also stages her critique, forwarded in such works as Democracy and Social Ethics, through a complex refiguring of the literary dimension of her own autobiographical character in Twenty Years at Hull-House. In striking a performative middle ground between an understanding of character as either social inscription or radical self-determination, Addams makes a counterhierarchical notion of interclass and interethnic identification essential to a “Progressive” realization of a pluralist, democratic civic sphere.

Keywords:   class contact, charity work, Jane Addams, emulation, exemplification, character reform, Twenty Years at Hull-House, Democracy and Social Ethics

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.