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The Signifying CreatorNontextual Sources of Meaning in Ancient Judaism$
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Michael D. Swartz

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780814740934

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814740934.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

The Signifying Creator

Chapter:
(p.91) 6 Conclusions
Source:
The Signifying Creator
Author(s):

Michael D. Swartz

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814740934.003.0006

This concluding chapter states how in ancient Judaism, methods of interpretation and discourse on the nature of signs were not confined to scripture and its interpretation, but extended to the world of celestial, terrestrial, and ritual things and occurrences. The primary circles of rabbinic authorities were more likely holding to the notion of the Torah, as elaborated by scholastic tradition, as the exclusive source of revelation. But at the same time, some sectors of Jewish culture in late antiquity embraced alternatives to this worldview. This suggests that the pantextual theory of revelation was an ideological development in rabbinic thought that shared space with a more encompassing view of divine signification.

Keywords:   Ancient Judaism, rabbinic authorities, Torah, revelation, pantextual theory, divine signification

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