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September 12Community and Neighborhood Recovery at Ground Zero$
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Gregory Smithsimon

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814740842

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814740842.001.0001

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Class and Community Organizations

Class and Community Organizations

Chapter:
(p.162) 6 Class and Community Organizations
Source:
September 12
Author(s):

Gregory Smithsimon

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814740842.003.0007

This chapter examines how physical space and the socioeconomic class of residents shaped community activism in Battery Park City before and after September 11. It compares the activism of Battery Park City groups and community activism as detailed in several classic ethnographies of low-income communities to illustrate how the physical boundaries that defined the social community influenced the positions that groups took, the alliances they forged, and the way they defined themselves. It shows that class mattered, not only in the money residents could contribute at fundraising events, but also in terms of political agency and residents' views toward community organizing and leadership roles.

Keywords:   physical space, socioeconomic class, community activism, Battery Park City, September 11, low-income communities, physical boundaries, social community, political agency, community organizing

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