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Sites UnseenArchitecture, Race, and American Literature$
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William A. Gleason

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814732465

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814732465.001.0001

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Introduction Race, Writing, Architecture

Introduction Race, Writing, Architecture

American Patterns

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Race, Writing, Architecture
Source:
Sites Unseen
Author(s):

William A. Gleason

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814732465.003.0006

This introductory chapter describes how the book looks at author Charles Chestnutt's work and the state of late nineteenth-century American architecture in exploring architectural representations. These include the built environment of slavery and sites that had largely been overlooked or ignored by scholars otherwise interested in the intersections between literature and architecture. The book generally seeks to make cultural and material practices that have gone largely unremarked visible and significant. Instead of focusing exclusively on the grand, the book examines some of the overlooked plots and structures that can and should inform a more comprehensive consideration of the literary and cultural meanings of American architecture. This chapter presents some of the texts and objects in which race, architecture, and representation have been inextricably linked in the U.S. in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Keywords:   American architecture, architectural representations, Charles Chestnutt, literature, race

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