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Global FamiliesA History of Asian International Adoption in America$
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Catherine Ceniza Choy

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780814717226

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814717226.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

New Geographies, Historical Legacies

Chapter:
(p.161) Conclusion
Source:
Global Families
Author(s):

Catherine Ceniza Choy

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814717226.003.0007

This concluding chapter examines the new geographies as well as the Cold War history and legacy of international adoption in the United States in the second half of the twentieth century and the first few years of the twenty-first century. It considers the changes that have occurred with respect to international adoption since the 1970s, especially its evolution as a truly global industry. It cites the dramatic rise in the number of international adoptions since the 1950s and 1960s and the increased diversity of the national origins of adoptive children in the United States. It also looks at other countries that have become important receiving nations of internationally adopted children, led by Norway and Spain. Finally, it discusses new controversies that have emerged such as the issue of gay and lesbian adoption. Given the vibrancy of the communities formed through Asian international adoption, the chapter calls for an expansion of the field of Asian American Studies to include adoptee experiences in its teaching, research, and professional service.

Keywords:   international adoption, adoptive children, United States, Norway, Spain, gay adoption, lesbian adoption, Asian international adoption, Asian American Studies

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