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Get a JobLabor Markets, Economic Opportunity, and Crime$
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Robert D. Crutchfield

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780814717073

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814717073.001.0001

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Toward a More General Explanation of Employment and Crime

Toward a More General Explanation of Employment and Crime

Chapter:
(p.182) 7 Toward a More General Explanation of Employment and Crime
Source:
Get a Job
Author(s):

Robert D. Crutchfield

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814717073.003.0007

This chapter presents an expanded labor stratification and crime thesis that explains crime patterns under different economic and industrial conditions, and in places other than urban places in modern states. It emphasizes the characteristics of the jobs people have. Just like the case of manufacturing workers of Pittsburgh, Cleveland, and Detroit in the twentieth century, their jobs gave them security, conditioned their lifestyles and repressed not only their criminality, but those of their children's as well. The same is true for many who labor in the high-level service occupations of the later twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. What remains important is the quality of the jobs available to people. The proliferation of high-quality jobs with primary sector characteristics will inhibit criminality, while low-quality work or no work at all—labor market marginality—is criminogenic.

Keywords:   labor stratification, crime thesis, crime patterns, urban, manufacturing, high-level service occupations, criminality

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