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Test Tube FamiliesWhy the Fertility Market Needs Legal Regulation$
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Naomi R. Cahn

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814716823

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814716823.001.0001

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What Is Wrong with Technology?

What Is Wrong with Technology?

Chapter:
(p.165) 9 What Is Wrong with Technology?
Source:
Test Tube Families
Author(s):

Naomi R. Cahn

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814716823.003.0009

This chapter examines the cultural and moral concerns arising from future regulation of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and other reproductive technologies, including the potential of ART to challenge the traditional two-parent heterosexual family and the ability of technology to allow parents to engage in prenatal screening. Four main issues are addressed: the ability of reproductive technology to allow for only one legal parent; the unavailability of reproductive technology to certain socioeconomic classes; the concern that beneficiaries of reproductive technology are playing God by altering natural reproduction; and the way reproductive technologies are intertwined with more controversial issues such as cloning and stem cell research. The chapter takes into account a variety of religious, historical, and philosophical objections with different aspects of reproductive technology, from preimplantation genetic diagnosis to the moral status of embryos and embryos as property. It also considers how domestic and foreign courts and legislatures have addressed reproductive technology issues and concludes by analyzing the power of private contracts in agreements involving sperm donation and surrogacy.

Keywords:   assisted reproductive technology, reproductive technologies, heterosexual family, prenatal screening, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, embryos, private contracts, sperm donation, surrogacy

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