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Test Tube FamiliesWhy the Fertility Market Needs Legal Regulation$
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Naomi R. Cahn

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814716823

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814716823.001.0001

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Market Regulation

Market Regulation

Chapter:
(p.43) 3 Market Regulation
Source:
Test Tube Families
Author(s):

Naomi R. Cahn

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814716823.003.0003

This chapter focuses on the legal regulation of the reproductive technology market, including the fertility clinics and gamete suppliers. For those seeking sperm, there are thousands of possibilities. In the United States alone, dozens of sperm banks are available as part of a business that accounts for about $75 million per year. The number of physicians offering assisted reproductive services has also increased exponentially. However, there is little guarantee about the safety of sperm that one buys, the eggs that are used, the success rate of fertility clinics, or that the embryo created with one's egg and her partner's sperm is the embryo that will be transferred into her body. The amount of market regulation at the state and federal levels with respect to reproductive technologies is limited. This chapter first provides a historical background on artificial insemination as a solution to infertility, along with the programs for both egg and sperm donation. It then discusses self-regulation in the reproductive technology industry before examining the laws that apply to sperm and egg donation.

Keywords:   legal regulation, reproductive technology market, fertility clinics, gamete suppliers, market regulation, reproductive technologies, artificial insemination, sperm donation, self-regulation, egg donation

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