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Doing Time in the DepressionEveryday Life in Texas and California Prisons$
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Ethan Blue

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780814709405

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814709405.001.0001

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Going Home

Going Home

Chapter:
(p.213) 8 Going Home
Source:
Doing Time in the Depression
Author(s):

Ethan Blue

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814709405.003.0008

This chapter examines the ways in which pardon or parole revived old forms of patronage in newly bureaucratized procedures. Leaving the prison, as much as entering it, reproduced region-specific hierarchies of race, sex, class, gender, and nation. For instance, officials in California, an aesthetically modern and liberal penal state, tended to favor an extensive parole program. Along with many progressive penologists of the day, they were convinced that parole was a necessary component of incarceration and release. In contrast, the assumption in Texas was that prisoners should serve their full sentences, unless significant extenuating circumstances surrounding the crime were discovered. Thus, most Texas prisoners served their full terms.

Keywords:   pardon, parole, prisoners, patronage, California, Texas

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