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The Next GenerationImmigrant Youth in a Comparative Perspective$
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Richard Alba and Mary C. Waters

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814707425

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814707425.001.0001

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National and Urban Contexts for the Integration of the Second Generation in the United States and Canada

National and Urban Contexts for the Integration of the Second Generation in the United States and Canada

Chapter:
(p.207) 10 National and Urban Contexts for the Integration of the Second Generation in the United States and Canada
Source:
The Next Generation
Author(s):

Jeffrey G. Reitz

Ye Zhang

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814707425.003.0010

This chapter compares the immigrant “gateway regions” in Canada and the United States, emphasizing that local contexts are critical for assessing the experience of the second generation. It contrasts the educational attainments of second-generation Chinese and blacks with the attainments of both the parental immigrant generation and native-born whites. This overall optimistic assessment shows that the economic disadvantages of the parental generation have not prevented substantial educational mobility for the second generation. But the study also shows that national-level comparisons overestimate the relative educational advantages and mobility for the second generation. This is because immigrants and the second generation are concentrated in global cities—cities that have experienced a great deal of immigration but also cities where natives tend to have higher educational attainments than natives in the nation as a whole.

Keywords:   gateway regions, Canada, United States, second-generation Chinese, second-generation African Americans, educational mobility, local contexts, educational advantages, parental immigrant generation, native-born whites

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